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When I am in a car and have to sit in the back seat, I feel super-nauseous. Help!

Ick—motion sickness is especially common in girls ages 10 to 13. It happens when your senses get all out of whack. Your inner ear, which keeps you balanced, tells your brain you’re moving. Meanwhile, your eyes only see the back of your brother’s head, so they send signals that you’re not going anywhere. The result? You feel like you might throw up, your mouth waters, you get dizzy, and your skin turns pale. “The front seat is better because you can see your surroundings move,” explains Dr. Rachel Rosen, “so your inner ear and eyes stay in synch better.” If you can’t sit shotgun, try these tricks: Roll the window down, focus on faraway objects, listen to headphones while looking out the window, don’t read or play video games, and avoid greasy foods before riding. If you’re still queasy, take an over-the-counter med like Dramamine before buckling up. Be warned, though, that Dramamine can put you to sleep. Some people get relief from special pressure-point bracelets, such as BioBands.

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by GL | 2/1/2016
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